Hobby Positivity on Twitter

Someone mentioned that they were trying to be more positive on twitter, and someone else asked me how I seem so unrelentingly positive on Twitter, so I thought I’d pop together my unspoken rules of Twitter Hobby Etiquette for fun positive interactions.  I certainly make mistakes from time to time, but generally my upbeat tone seems to resonate with the hobby field.  So what’s my secret?

Well, one obvious one is to make sure your twitter client is set to “Latest Tweets” or equivalent.  If you rely on Twitter’s default, you’ll see hundreds of tweets from people liking posts or from people you don’t follow, and that can really move you away from seeing little models and seeing, well, practically anything.  That can sour your mood before you even begin!

Another technically related tip is to use the “Retweet with Comment” option sparingly, if at all.  Any time you do this, it looks like a focussed deliberate, thought out response, and any hint of negativity looks like a deliberate attack, not a discussion.  I’ve done it a few times accidentally, or trying to be funny, and if you misjudge, it’ll look vicious.  Try to think twice, or use it to highlight very positive things, rather than using this often.

Most of the tips aren’t really related to features, though, but a general approach, and it all goes back to a piece of advice I learnt when I started work for interacting with people – praise in public, criticise in private.  

Essentially, for social media, tweet whatever the heck you like on your own timeline as standalone tweets.  If you didn’t like a new model, feel free to post up you didn’t like it if you want.  Don’t feel constrained in what you want to express in your own tweets.  However, don’t crap over other people’s fun.  Don’t reply to someone who loves something  to say “I hated that”.  Let’s think for a minute on what the possible outcome can be.

  • They are convinced by you, and lose something fun from their lives.
  • They ignore you, and will respect your tweets less in future.
  • You have a blazing public row, and end up never interacting again with another fun hobbyist

The only possible beneficial outcome is basically if they argue with you and convince you to like it, as then you both have something fun in your life.  But I’ve never in ten years on twitter seen this outcome.  Oddly, saying why you liked something to someone who doesn’t is a far more positive experience, generally.  You aren’t trying to take fun away.

On the flip side, genuinely praising people by saying why you like something instead of just mashing the like button has much more of an impact too.

Now, there is obviously a middle ground.  When people ask for advice or genuine criticism, that’s different than just crapping on something they adore. Offer genuine advice, but try to mention positives rather than just negatives.  If they want to know how they can improve in terms of painting, try to mention the bits you think are strong already as well as possible improvements.  

Finally, one thing that often happens in tweets is that we have a limited space to express our concepts.  Sadly, one of the areas we tend to remove in order to focus on the main concept are often the key words we’d use when talking to people, which take the edge off what we say.  We can lose the oil that lubricates the wheel of social interaction.  Saying “I absolutely love the models, and I wish I’d have better luck with them on the field, but they’ve always been crap for me” is far less confrontational and negative than just “They’ve always been crap”.  Sometimes it’s worth spreading out over a few tweets and keeping those  perspectives there.

Oh, and some of us will be friends either in real life or have interacted regularly online for years.  In those cases, the general guidelines go out of the window, just like you can talk with mates in a different way than a stranger in a GW store.  Don’t assume that because you see a teasing interaction that your tweets will be seen in the same light!  That’s probably the most solid advice I’d generally give – think of talking to strangers in your local GW as a guideline.  If you wouldn‘t say it to them if you overheard them talking, don’t tweet it to someone.

Play it Painted?

I was having a discussion on twitter (that immediately got derailed) about what sort of painting projects can be fun, and I suggested painting up board games like Hellboy or Dungeon Saga, as board games stand in isolation.  No one expects the game pieces to be painted so its a nice stress free distraction, but armies for Warhammer 40K?  There’s a definite expectation that armies should be painted or at least will be painted over time, and that can sometime make it feel like work – I have to get this painted or I can’t field it.

Someone bounced into the conversation to say that thats not true.  GW don’t have any such barriers up, if you want to play with unpainted pieces you can, and any pressure is just from a few individuals in the community.  I’m afraid I can’t agree.

Now, I’m not saying that shouldn’t be the case!  I’ll happily play anyone if I think I’ll have a fun game.  But the hobby is definitely based around the concept of playing with painted armies.  Many people will flat out refuse to play unpainted armies.  Some stores won’t allow less than a three colour minimum.  Warhammer World events have a fairly stringent set of requirements that involve no bits from other manufacturers, fully painted, and these events are described as the “pinnacle of the hobby” by Warhammer World – which clearly indicates the aspirational goal for people in the GW community.  On twitter, you’ll regularly see campaigns to “#PlayItPainted”.  There’s a meme stratagem aimed at unpainted models that floats around featuring the face of GW painting, Duncan Rhodes.  Whether or not its right, playing with painted armies is expected in tournaments, in many stores, and by many players and the wider community.  Saying “you can play how you like” doesn’t help if opponents walk away and you can’t take part in events.

If you just want to play at home against a mate, you can do what you like.  If you want to buy into the wider community, you do have to go along with the general community rules, and at the moment, that would seem to be painted armies, or at least working towards that goal.

I rarely play, and paint far more.  I love painting.  But at the moment, things are stacked against those who don’t like painting but love the game, short of throwing money at commission painters.

And is the pressure to be at least moving towards painted minis bad?  Its a far more absorbing experience for me, and anecdotally many others when all the models are clearly identified in glorious colours instead of sprue grey where you can’t identify the weapons or gear easily.

Is there a good answer?  Introduce gaming tournaments where all that matters are results?  Deprecate the painting part of the hobby to make it more about the game?  There isn’t a perfect solution.

All I can do is enjoy painting my minis, and be willing to have a fun game whenever I can, regardless of how painted the opposition is.

Should GW add women to Space Marines?

There has been a lot of argument on Twitter on this topic for a while, so I thought I’d go through what I see as the pros and cons of both sides of the argument.

I say both sides, but this is actually a three sided argument!  There is one argument for introducing female space marines as if they’ve always been there, an argument to keep everything exactly as it is, and a third stance saying “why not kept the history as is, but introduce female space marines as a new option like the Primaris Marines were recently introduced?”

Now, if you look at the models purely as game pieces, it’s just ludicrous to have the primary faction in a game designed in 2019, often included as both sides (with Chaos Marines having the same issue) of the main starter sets being gender exclusive.  Of course, the game was designed in the 1980s, not 2019, and culturally there was a much bigger divide in hobbies than here is today.  2000AD simply introduced lady judges as if they had always been a part of Judge Dredd, and that was successful in a similar cultural icon.  Why couldn’t that work here?  They’ve thrown the history out repeatedly for other changes like dropping Squats and rebuilding the entire Necron history.  Why not here?

Well, one reason is that the background back then specifically excluded the possibility of female space marines, and that takes us into the opposing position – that 30 years of shared fictional history including hundreds of published stories as well as 30 years of rule books and army codexes have given us a shared universe we all enjoy, so why change it?  Why throw out all those books and novels and shared enjoyment when we could simply release more models in other lines and make that there are options for women to play and feel accessible – the new launch of the Sisters of Battle line is often a key part of this counterpoint, as it involves a line of models that are just women.

The intermediate stance is simply that we could look at a compromise position – keep the history as is, but evolve the ongoing storyline.  Introduce women into the ranks of marines as the new discoveries that allowed the creation of the next generation of marines also allow the genetic enhancements to work with both sexes.  It’s an easy, simple fix, and would allow reasonable people on all sides to come together.  If you don’t like them, you could still build male marine chapters, or others could build all women chapters.  

Some point to the satirical background of Warhammer 40K, and highlight the fact that Space Marines aren’t supposed to be aspirational or inclusive.  They are, in fact, pretty much the extreme example of what is often referred to as toxic masculinity- exemplifying intolerance, and violence as a preferred solution.  There’s certainly some truth to this viewpoint, I think, but the parodic  and satirical nature of 40K has been somewhat lost under a more traditional sci-fi overlay over the years – I’m not sure it’s as obvious to people joining the hobby now as it was in the Rogue Trader days.

i think it’s easy as people argue abstract positions to ignore the fact that honestly there are a lot of people in the hobby that are bigoted and would keep women out if they could.  Latching onto excuses like the shared history allow them to avoid appearing prejudiced, but honestly?  Sometimes people are.  It’s very important not to tar everyone with that brush, but it’s also important that the industry leader in the wargaming field do what it can to be available to everyone.

The biggest problem, really, is that the lore and in game history about Space Marines is, in this instance, bloody terrible.  The entire argument basically goes “We can re-engineer men from the basic genetic code up to be immortal Demi-gods of War, but we can’t do the same for women, because they are girls.”

There are so many strong stories one way or another.  Buy fully into the despotic, terrible universe, and cast the Emperor as a utter sexist bastard who wouldn’t sort it out because he felt girls shouldn’t go to war.  Go Jurassic Park, and have life find a way in the early tests on women – and a fully viable immortal replacement species for humanity was exactly what the Emperor wanted to avoid as he wants humanity to thrive, not perish.  Have the move as part of the Emperor’s prescient design as systematically culling the genes for successful  Astartes  leads to the psychically immune blanks rising in replacement and saving all humanity.  Maybe his second wave of design was a set of female primarchs and their Astartes children, and that fell apart because of the Heresy.

But saying “no, we can’t get it working for girls” is shockingly weak story telling at best.  It sounds more impressive if you say “The lore doesn’t allow for them”, but really?

I’ve been playing 40k since it launched.  I enjoy the shared history and background, and would prefer major changes to be in the way the story moves forward than throwing all the history out.  I could cope with the monastic male warrior tradition if the story is fleshed out with something convincing (and better representation continues elsewhere), or women joining the ranks as new Primaris marines too.  But there are three main things I’d really like to see – people on one side of the argument not accusing everyone else of being misogynistic bastards, people on the other side not shouting about SJWs and virtue signalling, and some damn decent story underlying the move forward, whatever route that takes.

EDIT – Just some additional notes.  I mentioned a few reasons that would be much stronger to explain the lack of female space marines from a story telling perspective, but they don’t really work if introduced now (unless you introduce a new faction of some kind to explore it as well as a Black Library series).  Adding a better excuse 30 years later is definitely a cop out – if there was a solid story reason already in place I’d be more inclined to accept the cries of “but the lore”.

I’d also like to quickly address the other argument – that there already exists an all women army in the game with Sisters of Battle, so its all fair.  I have some sympathy with this view point, mostly because I love Sisters of Battle and am very excited for the new release, and I’d love for the sheer scope of the Sisters to be raised to the same profile as Space Marines.  However, arguing its all fair because there are some female factions is a bit specious.  Why?  Because first, the Sisters of Battle aren’t an all woman faction at all.  You can field male priests (that outrank the sisters), male crusaders, male arco-flagellants, male penitent engines in the same list.  It’d be like having the option in the marine list to field women representatives of the High Council that all marines have to answer to, having dreadnaughts not containing marine heroes but male or female guard heroes, and turning the victrix guard into cool lady knights guarding the top bods.  Now, that actually sounds pretty awesome, to be fair, but it isn’t the case.

In addition, while Space Marines are the flagship force, with Blood Angels, Dark Angels, Space Wolves, General Marines, Chaos Marines, Thousand Sons and Death Guard all representing with their own lists, there have been long periods of time with no Sisters of Battle Codex at all, no minis in the shops, only 20 year old + sculpts available online at incredibly high prices (£50 a basic squad as compared to £20.50 for a metal guard squad, for example).  Its not exactly two high profile, easily available forces with Sisters and Marines jostling for place in the starter sets.

What of Sisters of Silence, introduced at the same time as Custodes?  We still have almost no Sisters of Silence available, and a pretty big old range of Custodes introduced already.  Again, its not really a great argument to point to a token box and say, look, it must be OK, there are a few ladies in a different list.

While Space Marines are the primary force sold in the game, with no solid reason not to add women to their ranks given the recent introduction of changes with Primaris Marines, we’ll hear continuing calls to make the entry armies more accessible to everyone, and I think rightly so.

Golden Demon Entries

Well, this year I’m certainly not entering Golden Demon, as time is a bit too stretched, the 11/12 May isn’t available to get to Warhammer Fest, and honestly I’m not a good enough painter right now!

I did think it’d be fun to pretend to enter though, and do a practice run for an entry next year, which might help out others thinking of entering too.  Golden Demon, unless you are just amazingly talented, isn’t really a spur of the moment decision to enter.  You need to read the guidelines, plan your entry thoroughly, and then put the pieces together to the very best of your ability.  There are a lot of concepts and information that can help with that planning process.

You can get the guidelines for the 2019 Golden Demon here.  Its well worth investigating the whole golden-demon.com site to get a feel for previous entries, the standard of painting and the popular styles.

I’ve gone through the last few years entries, read through the guidelines, and checked what some of the big name painters and the judges have said, and these are my loose thoughts on how to prepare:

  • Golden Demon isn’t purely a painting contest.  It’s a chance to express a core theme of the world you’ve chosen to paint in, be that 40K, Age of Sigmar, Horus Heresy, Bloodbowl or the like.  You can choose that theme, and show your own take on it, but it’s important to remember that in general you should exhibit a theme from the lore, not something 100% original of your own.  Its a public reflection of their world.  If you want to be creative, you have more scope with Age of Sigmar pieces where the lore isn’t as defined.  Looking at 40K entries, for example, in 2018, you’ll see top 3 pieces for Cadians in standard colours, Imperial Fists, Space Wolves, codex librarians, Salamanders, White Scars.  Implementing a central familiar scheme really well definitely seems favoured over uniqueness.

There’s a section in the guidelines that covers this, buried away in the FAQ.

“The background and setting are important as well. The judges will be looking at how well the entry fits in to Games Workshop’s different worlds and universes – a strong narrative can go a long way towards grabbing the judges attention.”

  • Should you convert your models?  Well, the guidelines give an enthusiastic yes, it’s fine, but it is critical to only use GW parts or completely scratch build.  However, looking at the entries over the last few years?  I’d actually say large scale conversions are discouraged.  Kit bashing, reposing, and the conversion or sculpting of one or two unique components would seem to be key.  Remember, Golden Demon does have other criteria, but is at heart a painting contest, not a modelling contest.  A really well done off the shelf model can compete with a a tweaked one, as long as the overall composition of the entire piece works.
  • Basing your models is tricky.  Looking through the history, you probably want some sort of display plinth, and your model should be solidly attached to the plinth to allow the judges to pick it up and examine the model.  In terms of the base around the models feet, the key here (short of dioramas) is to ensure that the base meets the theme of the piece, but doesn’t draw attention away from the core model.  Indeed, if the base composition draws the viewer’s eye back to key parts of the model, that’s ideal.  Some people can go nuts, especially for duel and squad pieces, but the real key is not taking attention off the model and matching the overall theme. 
  • Painting techniques – certain techniques come and go in popularity over time, and no particular technique seems favoured by the judging panel.  NMM and TMM techniques were very popular in 2018, but there were certainly entries that didn’t use them.  Edge highlighting was comparatively muted, and used generally as part of an overall lighting and layering strategy rather than a technique in its own right.  The important thing to note about techniques, though, is that it isn’t about a particular technique, but how well the piece as a whole is implemented.  Brushwork needs to be crisp and precise.  Blending needs to be consistently smooth.  Coverage needs to be absolutely consistent.  Lighting is also very important.  Every model I looked at on the golden demon website, you could clearly see was “lit” by a virtual light point, and every shade, blend and highlight worked coherently from that point.  The techniques to reflect that varied, but the core concept was clear.
  • Consistency – really high quality work across the whole entry is one of the big keys to doing well.  If any one style or technique lets you down, either make sure you practice a heck of a lot before your entry, or use different methods.  Any obvious change in standard will be obvious to the judges.  
  • Unique or Freehand work – this is an interesting one, looking at the entries.  On the whole, freehand customisations were limited.  Flames on a blood bowl players armour looked excellent, and were paired with a really solid paint job on the normal clothes rather than further freehand.  On space marines, iconography was a chance to show off, rather than free handing on lots of panels that would normally be chapter colours.  Basically, the entries that seemed to do well took little tweaks and pushed their complexity up a notch, rather than going overboard across the whole model.
  • Composition seems to really be key.  The entry needs to be balanced, draw the eye to key features, and reflect the dynamism (or lack off) of the central model.  Composing and assembling the piece to a very high standard (of course, with the highest standard on mould line removal, join marks and so on) is a large part of the battle.  It’s particularly tricky to implement this, and paint in subassemblies to allow easy brush access, while painting to exhibit a consistent light source too.  
  • In addition, you should be using colour theory to the best of your ability to balance the theme of the piece, and to break it deliberately for contrast spot colours to draw the eye to particular elements.  It’s tricky, and if thats a step too far, you can get a large chunk of the way simply by implementing an existing army colour scheme to the best of your ability.

I’m not a winning Golden Demon painter at all, but that’s my takeaway on the areas I’d look into if preparing to enter for the first time – in one line, you are looking to do:

consistent, high quality painting over a well posed model using strong colour theory and lighting concepts, reflecting a core narrative from a codex or novel.

The real highlight to win would be the Heavy Metal contest, where you all paint the same model with no customisation.  That’s truly down to individual painting skill, and the Idoneth Tidecaster in 2019 is really challenging, with a huge range of different textures to bring out, and the looser AoS lore opens up more colour options.  Fascinating!

Hobby Plans for 2019

Well, as we’re two weeks into 2019, I suppose I really should start doing some kind of planning!

First, I really want to track my work, as though I lost track towards the end of 2018, logging my painting made a big difference in getting things done.  I’m going to take part in #painthammer2019 – you can find loads of details over on JewelKnightJess‘s blog Silent Dream.

Second, as a rough target for the year, I’m going to aim for 100 painted minis.  I think thats achievable, and should keep me pushing and painting hard enough to get it done.

Third, I want to “finish off” my Sisters of Battle armies, which are coming up for a major relaunch.  I have two armies, one in green (the Order of the Verdant Garden) and one in silver (the Order of the Argent Shroud).  Both need some reworking for the 8th edition beta codex, and both need some key models painted for a “complete” force of around 2000pts.  Things like a couple of Gemina Superior to protect Celestine, finish off any odd or missing people from complete units, do extra Rhinos for the various squads, add an Exorcist to the Silver Sisters, and so on.  It’s not trivial amounts, but not impossible amounts either.

Fourth, I want to start a new Sisters of Battle army in the traditional Black and Red when the new army is released in plastic.  I can make a start on this with Celestine and the Geminae from the Triumvirate set, and a Canoness Veridyan.  Fingers are crossed for an all plastic exorcist and a Sisters flyer of some kind.

Fifth, I want to try and keep on top of Warhammer Conquest.  I’ve done a rubbish job so far, and its rather starting to build up, especially as I’ve built my Dark Imperium set alongside it and picked up a few extra copies of some of the issues, as well as kitbashed some primaris, and added a chaplain and a box each of intercessors, reivers and plague marines to the mix too.

Sixth, 2019 is going to be the year of the terrain for me!  With RubbleCity and a Suluco (think space hulk tiles in Resin) due from Fenris Games this year, and with terrain coming in from Warhammer Conquest and from my Shadow War and Kill Team starter sets, plus a _lot_ of old Sector Imperialis buildings that need gluing back together after a move, I should have enough terrain to run my own club!

Seventh, I want to paint up one or two Blood Bowl teams, like the new Dark Elves and my cracking Iron Golems set of Halflings.

Eighth, I want to cherry pick the odd fantasy mini to paint for fun, so I don’t get stuck grinding on tasks for the hell of it, so I’m staying subscribed to my monthly bones pack.  I won’t get them all painted, but it’ll be fun.

Ninth, and this is unlikely, but I would like to also pick one of my board games like Zombicide, Dungeon Saga, Imperial Assault, Blackstone Fortress or Star Saga, and get at least the basic starter minis (or alternatives done).  Completing all the minis I have for one game would just be amazing.

Tenth, I want to make it to at least 2 Parent Players events this year, as they are just mind-blowing fun.

Eleventh, I’m in a Blood Bowl league online!  Hopefully it’ll be really fun, and I can make time for it!  Some cracking people in the league.

There are many more possibilities and projects on hold if I blow through these like some kind of hobby demon, but it’s pretty unlikely.  Time just isn’t going to permit it, I think.

Model Releases, Rules and Limitations for GW with 8th Ed

This is a response to a common question, particularly from veterans of early editions:

“Why don’t we have XYZ option in the rules right now?”

Examples of this include Blood Angel Primaris having Chainswords as an option, while normal marines or dark angels don’t, for example.  Why aren’t the rules the same for the basic units?

Now, I’m not a lawyer at all, but in my understanding it comes down to a legal decision in the states when a more litigious GW went into conflict with Chapterhouse Studios a few years ago over some of the additional models and conversion packs they were producing.  The decisions were pretty mixed, and no one came away happy, but one point did come out:

If you have rules in a game and don’t actively sell the parts or models for those rules, it is legitimate in the US for third parties to produce their own version.

So if they released rules for all Intercessor Sergeants to have chainswords, and only had chainswords for Blood Angels in the Blood Angels Primaris upgrade packs, it might be legal (I’m staying well clear of morality here) for another company to actively produce and market chainswords for the other chapters.  It might even be OK to produce Primaris Sergeants with Chainswords.  And if that happened before GW released them, there are all sorts of issues.

Essentially, it means that GW are in a position where they literally cannot provide rules for conversions unless they also produce the models without opening the door to alternative manufacturers in the US.  That’s just the way it is.  It’s one of the main reasons that the current codexes have entries exactly matching the single weapon load outs of the manufactured models.

Its also why they release new data sheets with new models, rather than putting all the rules in a new codex months before models arrive, and why we don’t see any named characters without a specific matching model.

Its also why a token selection of Sisters of Battle have been kept up on the site in metal for years – if they don’t have them on sale at all, others could potentially actively start to sell and market Adeptus Sororitas minis.  Actually as Sisters of Battle.

At most, you can complain a little as to why a specific load out hasn’t been chosen and released yet, but differences between ranges and codexes have to match the produced models.  It’s just the legalities of the marketplace. 

One interesting note on this – by providing the legends rules for AoS and one last made to order sale of the classic model before closing down the moulds, they may be opening up the production of some of the classic characters to third parties for those wanting to play narrative games at home too.  It’s a brave move with valuable classic IP, and fantastic for the community, so kudos!

Supercharging Primaris 101 – Understand your units

Now, some people may well disagree with this, but I think the best place to start when looking at maxing out your army effectiveness is the core units.  Forget the shenanigans for now – there’s no point looking at the best ways to interact units and powers unless you understand the units and abilities to begin with!

We also want to look at their battlefield role and how you might like to use them.  There are certainly some surprises in there.

Before we get onto specifics, lets discuss some of the common points that will affect most of the army.

First, we are looking at a proper Primaris based force, not a full Astartes force. We aren’t going to look at vehicles or units that don’t have the Primaris keyword.  That’s quite a handicap – cheap troops units like scouts are really useful in the current edition, and the range of vehicles and artillery are effectively restricted to the Repulsor – a fantastic but expensive tank.  Without any real dedicated transports, troops will be exposed out of cover – minimising battleshock and maximising armour saves are going to be pretty important.  It also restricts the usefulness of many of the stratagems that tie to specific units, like the classic whirlwind/land speeder pairing.

Primaris are tough, generally with 2 wounds, but still only normally have the 3+ save, and are particularly vulnerable to heavier weapons like plasma weaponry, or mass fire if caught in the open.  With a move of 6″, they aren’t going to break any records in advancing, so options for deep striking or repositioning will add a lot of value.

As troops excel at taking and holding objectives for battle forged armies, we need to weigh up the additional advantage taking troops.  If you generally play annihilation games, where the goal is defeating your enemy rather than by objective, troops are less important and may not be as good value for the points.

With “And They Shall Know No Fear” allowing morale rerolls, battleshock isn’t a major concern like it can be for other armies .  Larger units of 10 are quite practical, especially with the option to split fire in 8th, and can significantly help in close combat.  Mind you, smaller units let you take more of the special options like sergeants and grenade launchers, and can all get into the same tanks, so its tricky!  Hopefully we’ll get more of a grip on unit size later on.

Just one note – this is my take from a  quick study of the codex.  Is it right?  No idea for sure!  There may be codex approved changes I’ve missed, or seemingly unimportant upgrades that revolutionise a unit.  Do tell me in the comments and I’ll update this!

This particular review is only covering Games Workshop units, not FW ones, though there are some key Primaris associated units found there, like a superheavy tank.  I may cover those later!

HQ

Captain (standard Mk 10 armour)

The Primaris Captain is a mid tier Primaris hero, and its easy to spend points on wargear.   They are excellent close combat fighters – at range they are great shots but don’t really have any more long range firepower than an intercessor.

They let nearby units reroll hit rolls of 1 – that’s fantastic, as it affects the most possible rolls, and ensure a second chance to over overcharged plasma weapons exploding.

They can swap their bolt rifle for stalker bolt rifle, which is well worth it if lurking in the backfield to strengthen a gun line.  They can also take an optional power sword to max out their excellent close combat skills.  Taking both probably isn’t worth it, as if you have gone for long range maximisation, you won’t get full value of a power sword over the battle.

Their iron halo, giving them a solid 4+ invulnerable save, combined with 6 wounds makes them a durable bet.

Captain (Gravis armour)

This Primaris Captain is all in for assault. With a Pistol 3 weapon, they get 3 shots a turn even when locked up, and get the choice between a clumsier gauntlet or a power sword for their hits.  All their other abilities are pretty much the same as a normal Captain, but with offence limited to short range and maximised for pure close combat, you really need to commit to an aggressive play style.   With the pistol, all the ranged weaponry is focused on killing infantry – you need to kill anything tougher up close and personal.

Captain (Power fist)

This captain is awesomely optimised for damage at short range.  A plasma pistol combined with their ability to reroll 1s is fantastic, and the power fist and their 2+ to hit in close combat is also brilliant.  While still focussed on close range, this particular option is maximised for those who love plasma, or are fighting mechanised or high toughness elite troops.

Lieutenant

The lieutenant is the cheapest Primaris hero, though only just shy of the standard Captain, and its easy to spend points on wargear.  If you are tight on points and need HQ to fill out detachments, this may be a useful choice.  They are excellent close combat fighters – at range, like the captain, they are great shots but don’t really have any more long range firepower than an intercessor.

They let nearby units reroll wound rolls of 1 – that’s not as good as rerolling 1s to hit, like the captain, as it doesn’t help with plasma explosions, and it also affects less rolls on average, as any missed rolls to hit obviously reduce the dice pool that might come up as 1s.

They can swap their bolt rifle for stalker bolt rifle, which is well worth it if lurking in the backfield to strengthen a gun line, or for a powersword to max out their excellent close combat skills.

The only solid reason I can see (beyond needing cheap HQ) to pick a lieutenant is to pair him with a captain, giving nearby units and themselves rerolls on 1s for both hit and wound.  The lack of an iron halo makes them quite vulnerable to enemy headhunters otherwise.

Librarian

The librarian is an excellent close up fighter with a force weapon, provides psychic defence by denying the witch with their psychic hood, and also allows all sorts of psychic shenanigans to be layered in with other abilities.

You need to be careful due to their lack of invulnerable saving throws, but at least one librarian seems to be a solid bet, regardless of your play style.  Unless you go all in with Black Templar philosophy, of course!

With the short range of many psychic powers, the lack of ranged weaponry, and their close combat abilities, you really need to embrace the assault phase to really get the best of librarians.  If you want to play a more measured gun line approach, you may not find they add as much value.

Chaplain

Between boosting morale, a 4+ invulnerable save, amazing close combat skills and allowing nearby units to reroll all failed hit rolls in close combat, this guy is fantastic if you want someone to lead a charge.  Clocking in at 5 points under a  basic captain, they are at least as useful on the advance in combat with the crozius arcanum giving them +1S, -1AP and 2 damage.

On the flip side, these guys are almost useless on the defense with no firepower greater than a pistol, no bonuses to nearby units (except morale, which isn’t that important to Primaris) outside of combat.  If you take a chaplain, you need an aggressive play style to get value out of them.

Troops

Intercessors

Intercessors are the only troop option available to a Primaris force.  If you are playing an objective game, or looking at building battalions aiming at the +5cp to fuel stratagems, you’ll need some of these.

They have 3 choice of weapons – standard bolt rifles, which aren’t bad rapid fire weapons with a 30″ range, Auto bolt rifles, which as 24″ assault 2 weapons are fantastic for fire and move work, or stalker bolt rifles, which are heavy 1 weapons, but give you -2 ap and a 36″ range.  Honestly, unless you want a cheap filler unit (and if that’s the case, why are you looking at elite Primaris), it feels like you want stalkers for a gun line or backfield objective holding, and auto bolt rifles for a mobile unit hurtling around the battlefield.

One interesting upgrade is the auxiliary grenade launcher – you can take 2 of these per unit, which is only useful if you combat squad it.  It effectively gives you a mini missile launcher, with a 30″ range frag or krak grenade for 1pt – 2pts to take one in both combat squads.  This seems a no brainer!

Elites

Apothecaries

Damn, the apothecary is awesome.  Between resurrecting troops or healing heroes, he also totally beats face in close combat, with some awesome close range pistols and a great stat line.  I can see the apothecary being awesome to bolster a close combat captain/lieutenant pair.  Bonuses to hit and wound combined with healing?  Primaris smash!  Is he worth the points?  I’ not sure.  I think kept near a key unit or playing aggressively to get a return in close combat would pay off, but he isn’t cheap and not throwing out anything at range.

Ancient

An ancient (or standard bearer) basically increases the leadership of nearby units, which improves their chances of not losing any models to battle shock.  With “And They Shall Know No Fear” already in effect for Primaris, its not really all that helpful, unless taking big old units.  The 50% chance of getting a last shot or attack in for fallen models is pretty good, but only when the ancient is surrounded by casualties!  

Its a great concept and very cinematic – from a narrative perspective I’d always want to take one.  Effectiveness wise, though?  Maybe if combined with hell blasters in a gun line?  Honestly, I think you can probably do better for the points just by taking small units or going for an apothecary to get models back into action long term.

Reivers

Reivers feel like a fantastic concept, but the various options they offer just don’t seem to tie together very well.  Shock grenades stopping overwatch?  That’s fantastic – except with a 6″ move and 6″ range, you have to start within 12″ of the enemy to be able to actually pull this off.  Which generally means you’ve just been shot to hell (or maybe, if lucky, had an enemy fail a charge).  Reducing enemy leadership in 3″ is fantastic for causing morale issues, but its too short a range to help for anything beyond a heaving melee, and people are quite savvy at minimising battleshock effects.  Grapnel launchers let you ignore vertical components of movement and spiderman up to the top of buildings.  That could really add value on specific levelled terrain, but at lot of the time won’t be any use.  They also let you come in 9″ away from the enemy at deployment from any table edge, but they aren’t that scary a unit to derail an advance.  Grav chutes let you deep strike from turn 2 – but again that 9″ range and the 6″ range on shock grenades doesn’t quite gel.

If you are a great player, you can probably maximise these brilliantly.  Otherwise I feel you’ll have a unit that will have a monster game if things break for them, but generally won’t perform at all.  Play on a table with grapnel launchers and lots of buildings, and have a couple of charges against you fail, and they will be AMAZING.  Play on a flat table with a canny enemy and I think you’ll struggle a bit.

Redemptor Dreadnaught

Dreadnaughts!  This is the new dreadnaught introduced with the Primaris marines, and generally accepted as part of the Primaris line.  Dreadnoughts are much tougher in 8th edition than they used to be, and the range of fire power you can load them up with is pretty huge.  Up close, at range, they are monsters.  I might be wrong, but I feel maximising their load out for anti horde firepower is probably your best bet, with the onslaught gatling cannons chucking out silly amounts of reasonable firepower that will just clear out any big tarpit units.  

However, they will draw fire like mad, and performance will degrade as they take hits.  They aren’t cheap in terms of points, and as fire magnets, you have to accept you might not get your points back from them – but other, more vulnerable units are going to get away with much lighter fire.

Aggressors

Holy hell, these guys are awesome.  While they could really do with the ability to absorb more firepower, like a 2+ save or something, they are pretty resilient with the +1T from the gravis armour,  and laden down with firepower.  With two main load outs of either multiple 8″ flamers, or frag launchers and boltstorm gauntlets, you have a really nasty array of firepower in a not too expensive package.  I’ve heard more than one primaris player suggest building your army around these and hellblasters for really nasty doses of firepower.  Are they resilient enough to get up close to use their firepower?  I think you really need to weigh up your play style with aggressors, as though they look like excellent fun, they are something of a glass hammer, and I think you need to commit to an aggressive approach to get the most out of them.  Between close range firepower, no penalty on advancing and shooting their assault weapons,  and power fist smashing in close combat, they are fast, lethal and deadly.  But leave them exposed and they’ll go down just as fast as any other Primaris.

Heavy Support

Hellblasters

Oh, yeah!  Hellblasters!  An entire unit loaded down with Plasma Weaponry.  Now, I have to admit, I tend to overcharge EVERYTHING, so this may be my achilles heel, but keep a captain nearby to reroll ones, and these bad boys might just decimate everything!

5-10 plasma guns with rapid fire? Yes!  Oh Yes!  I’m tempted to look at spearhead detachments and just load up with these.  They won’t be quite as good as troops at taking objectives, but in terms of dishing out firepower they’ll be just awesome!

Fast Attack

Inceptors

A lot of people struggle with these, but I think they could work for me.  Why?  Because most people see them as the Primaris equivalent to Assault Marines, but they really aren’t.  My read on them is that they are a fast moving weapons platform, much closer in play style to Sisters of Battle Seraphim … which I love and play well.  The key is to use them for ambush strategies, hit and run techniques, while avoiding actual close combat where you can.  If you get stuck up close, the lack of proper close combat equipment will cost you dearly, I think.  My experience with Seraphim will help, but I think these could be a lot more effective if people just didn’t play them like assault marines.  Got higher hopes than expected from studying the data sheet.

Dedicated Transport

Repulsor

Repulsors are the only vehicle currently able to transport Primaris marines, and have a variety of load outs.  Its a big scary tank.  Its going to draw fire, so you have to accept it’s going to take some hits.  One obvious thought is that will spare others, even a Redemptor dreadnaught.   It can carry a fair chunk of weaponry, or maybe carry a brutal setup of aggressors with a couple of HQ for a lethal close range boost.

I think with so many points tied up in the one model, you have to have a solid plan for using it.  Maybe its delivering a brutal CC detachment right into enemy lines, allowing your Redemptor to get a turn or two untargeted, or simply as a turn 1 tank killer, but you really need to work out how to play around it.  One oddity is that a lot of the heavy weapon options are much more short ranged, like lastalons are much shorter ranged than equivalent las-cannons.  Again, I think it lends itself to the feel of Primaris as an aggressive short range army.

Lord of War

Roboute Guilleman

Roboute is frankly amazing, optimising nearby troops to perform like absolute monsters, while having the equipment and statistics to smash some serious opposition himself.  He optimises Imperium troops, not just Astartes, so its extra value in an Imperium soup force … though we’re staying clear of those.  He’s a heck of a lot of points, but will massive optimise your army.  The bigger the game, the easier it is to fit this monster in.  I think the only fault I’d have with including him is that I’m not 100% sure he counts as Primaris being a Primarch 🙂  It seems only fair as he had them invented, and the Death Guard that I’m also looking at get Morty though!

To get the most out of Roboute, you need him to tackle hotspots while he abilities optimise the troops in you lines most in need of success.  having them get full Rerolls to hit and wound and buying you additional CPs for stratagems really should help with some nasty shenanigans.

Making Death Guard Filthy 101 – Introduction

Just like the posts I’m going to pop up for Primaris, I also intend to look at Death Guard in the same way.  I’m going to stick with the Death Guard Codex – no plague bearers or the like, so there’s a fairly big chunk of optimisation that’s going to be missed out.

Still, we’re going to go step by step through the mechanics and possibly shenanigans to get the absolutely maximum bang for your Mortarion based geneseed buck.

We’ll be looking at detachments and ways to max out command points, ways of using stratagems and psychic powers, which units seem to be the best value on the battlefield, and so on.

I think what’s important, though, is we’ll discuss the best options for different play styles and how to maximise the army for you, not just for theory hammer.  If you play an aggressive close assault game, building an army based round long range firepower will feel frustrating and ineffective, regardless of what the statistics say.  Lets look at how to have fun with it.

Supercharging Primaris 101 – Introduction

OK!  I am feeling revitalised for some hobby.  One thing a recent gaming weekend taught me, though, is that you can’t just fill slots in a detachment and stick them on the tabletop anymore.  You need to seriously think about how units work together, how abilities augment each other, how strategems can max out unit effectiveness, and how psychic powers can double down on all the above.

I’m going to document my thoughts, notes and experiences in building an army (based largely on the Warhammer Conquest minis with some augmentation).  Over time, we’re going to go through the process of looking at what units should do on the battlefield, how we can make them most effective at it, and how we can achieve the result for the best point cost.

There are some restrictions, just to make life harder for myself.  In this series, I’m going to be looking at a pure Primaris army – I won’t be looking at taking any cheeky older Astartes, or Imperial allies (though I may highlight when I think that’d be most effective).

I’m not a very competitive gamer by nature, so I’d love to hear any corrections, options of missed or additional thoughts!

Hobby Resolutions for 2018

I have many hobby resolutions for this grand new year, many of which may fall by the wayside!  I’d rather have ambitious targets and get halfway than just potter along though!

First of all, I’m going to take part in multiple hobby challenges through the year, particularly #hobby500, aiming to finish 500 models this year, or approximately 10 a week, and the #painthammer2018 challenge (which is a smaller 365 models but has a few other goals and a really nice painting log involved).  Will I hit them?  With 2 small kids and recently moving house, probably not.  But I’ll give it a damn good try and get properly back into the hobby game!

Second, my hobby purchases are going under review.  I want to finish more of what I have, and I want to focus slightly more of my hobby fund on smaller miniature manufacturers.  Games Workshop is fantastic, and honestly I’ll still buy a chunk of their new releases, but regular small purchases to support independent mini makers like Hasslefree Miniatures, Heresy Minis, Bad Squid Games and the like can make all the difference to them keeping their doors open, and I’d hate to see those fantastic models vanish forever.

Third, I’m going to attend the #parentplayers event towards the end of April, meeting up at Warhammer World with a Fallen Angels army completely painted just for the event.  Its going to be awesome, and a great focus for getting a reasonable chunk of minis knocked out.

Fourth, I want to get some regular games on the go, with my brother and maybe attending some events or a Sheffield gaming club.  it’d rock!

Fifth, I want to keep this blog more active, with painting guides, techniques and the like.  Its great for my reference and a lot easier than working out what paints i used in 2 years time!

It doesn’t sound too unreasonable, does it?   On with 2018!