Golden Demon Entries

Well, this year I’m certainly not entering Golden Demon, as time is a bit too stretched, the 11/12 May isn’t available to get to Warhammer Fest, and honestly I’m not a good enough painter right now!

I did think it’d be fun to pretend to enter though, and do a practice run for an entry next year, which might help out others thinking of entering too.  Golden Demon, unless you are just amazingly talented, isn’t really a spur of the moment decision to enter.  You need to read the guidelines, plan your entry thoroughly, and then put the pieces together to the very best of your ability.  There are a lot of concepts and information that can help with that planning process.

You can get the guidelines for the 2019 Golden Demon here.  Its well worth investigating the whole golden-demon.com site to get a feel for previous entries, the standard of painting and the popular styles.

I’ve gone through the last few years entries, read through the guidelines, and checked what some of the big name painters and the judges have said, and these are my loose thoughts on how to prepare:

  • Golden Demon isn’t purely a painting contest.  It’s a chance to express a core theme of the world you’ve chosen to paint in, be that 40K, Age of Sigmar, Horus Heresy, Bloodbowl or the like.  You can choose that theme, and show your own take on it, but it’s important to remember that in general you should exhibit a theme from the lore, not something 100% original of your own.  Its a public reflection of their world.  If you want to be creative, you have more scope with Age of Sigmar pieces where the lore isn’t as defined.  Looking at 40K entries, for example, in 2018, you’ll see top 3 pieces for Cadians in standard colours, Imperial Fists, Space Wolves, codex librarians, Salamanders, White Scars.  Implementing a central familiar scheme really well definitely seems favoured over uniqueness.

There’s a section in the guidelines that covers this, buried away in the FAQ.

“The background and setting are important as well. The judges will be looking at how well the entry fits in to Games Workshop’s different worlds and universes – a strong narrative can go a long way towards grabbing the judges attention.”

  • Should you convert your models?  Well, the guidelines give an enthusiastic yes, it’s fine, but it is critical to only use GW parts or completely scratch build.  However, looking at the entries over the last few years?  I’d actually say large scale conversions are discouraged.  Kit bashing, reposing, and the conversion or sculpting of one or two unique components would seem to be key.  Remember, Golden Demon does have other criteria, but is at heart a painting contest, not a modelling contest.  A really well done off the shelf model can compete with a a tweaked one, as long as the overall composition of the entire piece works.
  • Basing your models is tricky.  Looking through the history, you probably want some sort of display plinth, and your model should be solidly attached to the plinth to allow the judges to pick it up and examine the model.  In terms of the base around the models feet, the key here (short of dioramas) is to ensure that the base meets the theme of the piece, but doesn’t draw attention away from the core model.  Indeed, if the base composition draws the viewer’s eye back to key parts of the model, that’s ideal.  Some people can go nuts, especially for duel and squad pieces, but the real key is not taking attention off the model and matching the overall theme. 
  • Painting techniques – certain techniques come and go in popularity over time, and no particular technique seems favoured by the judging panel.  NMM and TMM techniques were very popular in 2018, but there were certainly entries that didn’t use them.  Edge highlighting was comparatively muted, and used generally as part of an overall lighting and layering strategy rather than a technique in its own right.  The important thing to note about techniques, though, is that it isn’t about a particular technique, but how well the piece as a whole is implemented.  Brushwork needs to be crisp and precise.  Blending needs to be consistently smooth.  Coverage needs to be absolutely consistent.  Lighting is also very important.  Every model I looked at on the golden demon website, you could clearly see was “lit” by a virtual light point, and every shade, blend and highlight worked coherently from that point.  The techniques to reflect that varied, but the core concept was clear.
  • Consistency – really high quality work across the whole entry is one of the big keys to doing well.  If any one style or technique lets you down, either make sure you practice a heck of a lot before your entry, or use different methods.  Any obvious change in standard will be obvious to the judges.  
  • Unique or Freehand work – this is an interesting one, looking at the entries.  On the whole, freehand customisations were limited.  Flames on a blood bowl players armour looked excellent, and were paired with a really solid paint job on the normal clothes rather than further freehand.  On space marines, iconography was a chance to show off, rather than free handing on lots of panels that would normally be chapter colours.  Basically, the entries that seemed to do well took little tweaks and pushed their complexity up a notch, rather than going overboard across the whole model.
  • Composition seems to really be key.  The entry needs to be balanced, draw the eye to key features, and reflect the dynamism (or lack off) of the central model.  Composing and assembling the piece to a very high standard (of course, with the highest standard on mould line removal, join marks and so on) is a large part of the battle.  It’s particularly tricky to implement this, and paint in subassemblies to allow easy brush access, while painting to exhibit a consistent light source too.  
  • In addition, you should be using colour theory to the best of your ability to balance the theme of the piece, and to break it deliberately for contrast spot colours to draw the eye to particular elements.  It’s tricky, and if thats a step too far, you can get a large chunk of the way simply by implementing an existing army colour scheme to the best of your ability.

I’m not a winning Golden Demon painter at all, but that’s my takeaway on the areas I’d look into if preparing to enter for the first time – in one line, you are looking to do:

consistent, high quality painting over a well posed model using strong colour theory and lighting concepts, reflecting a core narrative from a codex or novel.

The real highlight to win would be the Heavy Metal contest, where you all paint the same model with no customisation.  That’s truly down to individual painting skill, and the Idoneth Tidecaster in 2019 is really challenging, with a huge range of different textures to bring out, and the looser AoS lore opens up more colour options.  Fascinating!

Getting started with painting

There was an interesting thread on twitter where someone about to pick up a brush to paint miniatures for the first time got introduced to about 20 of the top painters, and me for some reason.  Unfortunately, I would have found the thread profoundly unhelpful, as it turned into quite a complex discussion of paint ranges, brush types and the like as all the painters started interacting.  It really didn’t seem very very helpful, and I thought “Maybe I could put down some of the things that would have really helped me decades ago when I picked up a brush for the first time, and address some of the phrases that get thrown around a lot.

Getting ready to start painting

If you are just getting ready to start painting miniatures, what do you genuinely need?

You don’t need a lot to give it a try.  There is a heck of a lot you can buy, but honestly, to give it a go, you basically just need:

  • some test models.  Faces are often quite hard, so helmeted models are ideal.  I’m assuming you are happy building plastic models – I’m just looking at the painting side.  If you aren’t happy, look for all in one models like Reaper Bones, or push fit models like the “easy to assemble” line from GW.
  • at least one general purpose reasonable quality brush.
  • enough paints to cover the basic colours of your chosen test models.  You’ll hear lots of pros and cons of various ranges.  Honestly, when starting off, any standard starter set is probably fine, or just get the mini paints you need from the easiest supplier for now.  I’d suggest at least one neutral or sepia wash, like Agrax Earthshade from GW or Army Painter Strong Tone, as this will really help let you see a big jump forward in your painting effectiveness early on.
  • a jam jar or mug to have clean water in to clean your brushes and thin paints with.
  • a smooth surface to use as a palette.  A plastic palette from a starter set, an old tile, palette paper, plastic from packaging.  It just needs to be pretty level and not going to absorb the paint.
  • Stuff to put down on your painting area to stop getting paint everywhere.   Newspaper, old paper, painting tables, it doesn’t really matter.  Just don’t ruin the furniture!

You’ll hear all sort of suggestions, and honestly there is a lot you can add or try.  But to start painting, I think that’s all you need, with one more thing.  Patience.

There are two ways this is important.  In the process of painting, you often need to step back.  Let a model dry properly before putting more paint on, for example, and make sure the glue is dry on a model you’ve assembled before you start painting.  It  seems obvious, but it makes a tremendous difference, and its easier said than done when you want to get cracking!

Second, you aren’t going to turn out award winning models overnight.  It’s possible to do really nice tabletop models quite quickly, and practice and experimentation can let anyone get to the top end of the field over time.  But if you aren’t patient, accept that you’ll get better over time, and work on the basics, you’ll never improve.  You’ll either burn out by trying too much too quickly, or give up in frustration.  If you can enjoy putting paint on the models, and aim to do a little better than last time, you’ll have terrific fun and improve surprisingly quickly.

Painting your first models

Ideally, you could pop into a Games Workshop store and ask them if you can give it a go.  They’ll provide a model and paints, and an area designed to let you sit down and give it a try, and talk you through it.  It can be a fantastic introduction.  Of course, that’s not always convenient.  So whats important?

Well, this is where it has to get a bit vague, by necessity.  I don’t know what you are trying to paint, or what paints you have to hand!  Its really, really useful to find some youtube videos of people painting those specific models so you can actually see what someone does.  However, there are a some general principles that can really help.

First, you’ll hear a lot of talk about priming or undercoating your model.  Anyone who is a bit more experienced in the hobby does this for everything.  Essentially, if you spray or brush the entire model with a paint designed to go between a hard surface like metal and other paints, you’ll find the other paints rub off less.  If you use a spray paint coloured primer, you can also cut out the need to put on one of the big basic colours on the model.  Honestly, though, this step isn’t really that important for most modern plastic miniatures.  Resin and metal models need it more.  If you are just giving model painting a go, I wouldn’t worry about it right now.  Even the latest introduction guides to painting, such as those found in Warhammer Conquest, tend to skip this step now.

Next, don’t paint straight from the pots.  Put a little paint on your palette, and add some water.  It should be about as thin as semi-skimmed milk.  When you paint it on, you may find it doesn’t cover very well like this, especially lighter colours like yellow, and the temptation is to just ladle on the thick paint from the pot instead.  It’s far better to build up the coverage from lots of thin coats of paint that flow precisely from the brush than blobby, over thick coverage that will invariably not come off the brush smoothly and spoil the painting between the edges of different colours.  This is where patience comes in, as you need to let each coat dry completely before doing it again too.  As long as you don’t rush, you can take it slowly, treat it almost like a complex but fun paint by numbers.

Make sure you use a nice clean brush at every stage.  Thin the paint with clean water.  Clean your brush regularly – not just when you finish a colour, but if using a colour for an extended period, rinse off the brush every so often to avoid paint drying in the bristles and affecting the paint going onto the models.  Make sure your thinned paints on the palettes aren’t drying up, but keep them at the semi-skimmed milk consistency by adding more water every so often.  Once again, having the discipline to stop after a period of time, clean the brush, then keep going with the same colour will really pay off over time.

Once you have a reasonably tidy set of basic colours (and they are dry!), add a little water to your neutral wash, and paint the entire model with it.  It’ll instantly add depth, shade next to the corners (which helps tidy up any accidental brushstrokes), and the model will suddenly pop.  You’ll have done a model, and it’ll look pretty damn good.  I see plenty of models that haven’t had a wash and haven’t thinned their paints, and honestly, just with this you can get pretty nice tabletop quality minis.

Of course, that isn’t all there is to it.  So what are the next steps?

Well, a lot of it is basically doing this to enough models until you become sure and accurate with your brushstrokes!  Every model will improve.  There are specific ways you can expand your painting though.

Next Steps – Painting

Again, be patient – try these, but 

Undercoating your Model

We skipped past this for your first few models.  However, it’s really useful to spray them with an aerosol (except Reaper Bones miniatures – never use an aerosol as the propellant reacts badly with the material – they don’t need a primer!)  before starting to paint for several reasons:  

  • You can spray it a light colour like white, and lighter colours will look very vibrant painted over the top.
  • You can spray it a dark colour like black, and colours will generally look a little darker and more muted.
  • You can spray it a grey and have a neutral starting point on a surface all different types of paint and technique will set well on.
  • You can spray the whole model the main colour of the model, and reduce the amount you need to put on by brush.
  • You can spray the whole model the colour that is hardest to reach with the brush, so you don’t need to worry about trying to do it later.

It’s a fantastic way of getting consistent results, or saving time. In addition, it makes a massive difference with resin and metal models, where normal paint often doesn’t adhere as well.  Even on plastic models, it can help, and certainly starting with a colour or a light, neutral or dark shade all has effects.

As a bonus, if you give a quick spray with a lighter colour from just one angle (like a white over a grey), you get fantastic underlying colour layering with no effort.  Bonus!  This is called Zenithal highlighting and you can find much more detailed explanations elsewhere.

Adding more depth

We’ve basically looked at doing a simple base colour and covering the whole model with a single simple wash.  That’s actually really effective!  But we  can improve on it!  There are several ways we can add more effective depth to our colours.  We can do something called layering – manually add layers of colours, so we might paint a green area of colour a dark green, then leave the recesses and paint the rest a lighter green, then paint the top level an even lighter green.  My recommendations for a next step here are to try using 3 layers at first for colours that are on large areas.  The more layers you use, the better it will look.

We can apply more targeted washes or shades rather than just using one shade over the whole model.  You can get shades in gloss and matt variants – using a gloss version over metals looks much shinier.  Using appropriate colours, like a flesh wash over skin does look a bit better.  Using a very dark wash over strong colours like lead or gold looks great (in GW colours, that’d be Nuln Oil instead of Agrax).  Using a coloured wash adds depth without changing the underlying colour as much – you can match colours and add depth without changing the colours tone as much.  My recommendations for a next step here are to use a gloss darker shade on metal, flesh shade on skin, and still use Agrax for everything else. 

Finally, while a wash really helps add shadows, we often want a point at the very edges of a model that have really caught the light.  There are two main techniques for this – drybrushing and edge highlighting.  Drybrushing involves putting a very light colour on the brush, getting almost all the paint off a brush, and gently rubbing the brush over the model, so the very edges pick up the lighter effect.  You might use a lighter gold or even silver on gold, for example.  This technique looks particularly good on natural substances like fur or mud, where the element of randomness looks right.  Be warned, though, dry brushing ruins brushes, and you only want to use older brushes or dedicated dry brushes for it.   Edge highlighting involves a very careful tiny line right along the very edges of hard surfaces, like armour, and can really make a model pop.  Don’t use it on soft surfaces like cloaks, though, as it’ll tend to make it look like a fixed shiny surface instead.  There are lots of guides to both these techniques, provided by a range of professionals and companies.  I’d recommend trying drybrushing as the easier next step unless you feel really confident in your brush work.  If you want to paint fast to do an army, definitely look more at dry brushing!

Basing

Basing models is a skill in itself, but there are ranges of texture paints you can paint straight on and look pretty good.  You’ll want to pick options based on your normal battlefield, and the army itself, but normally you can just paint the base a light brown, apply a texture paint, dry brush the texture paint a lighter colour, and then either leave it, or glue on some flock or grass effect tufts with PVA glue.    There are lots of guides to basing, and it makes models look more finished, but you can do this to plain bases, or buy resin or plastic detailed bases and simply paint them like the rest of the model.  I really recommend checking into more detailed guides when you want to investigate basing options, but its a fun area to explore.

Next Steps – Equipment

OK, you’ve painted up your first few models and got a hunger for it.  You know you enjoy it.  It’s time to think about spending a little more money on more than the basics.

Brushes

We started off with a single standard brush – probably a standard brush from Army Painter or GW.  Most normal brushes aren’t bad, but will degrade quite quickly.  Over time, investing in a  better set of brushes can actually save you money, and you’ll get more consistent results with your brushwork week to week.  It’s really difficult to suggest brushes, as it is a very personal thing.  Kolinsky Sable brushes are generally accepted to be the best in the industry, but the individual handles and performance are very much down to the individual.  

Army Painter brushes have triangular handles that some people love and feel very stable in the hand.  GW brushes are really easily available!  I personally really rate the Workbench Warriors set from Rosemary & Co, which have been my favourite.  As you get try different brushes, though, you’ll find you like the way some feel in you hand, and you’ll want to look for ones with similar handles.

Its well worth investing in some brush soap to keep your brushes in top condition – think of these like a good shampoo and conditioner for your own hair.  The bristles will degrade quickly with no care, the shampoo will clear paint off the bristles, and the conditioner will make sure the bristles continue to stay soft and flow nicely.  Master brush cleaner is easily available from eBay or Amazon.

As an immediate next step, I’d just expand your brush range a little, and maybe try  brush or two from different ranges to see what you like in your hand, before spending too much.  Trying a few fine detail brushes can be fun, and maybe pick up a drybrush or a big brush to slap paint on a tank or monster.

Paints

Ah, painters can argue for hours about different paint ranges, and again, much of this comes down to individual taste.  It’s worth experimenting with new paints every so often to see if you like them.  My biggest recommendation is to get paints that you feel last, that look right for you, and that are available enough so you can pick up more without too much trouble.  Acrylic miniature paints are pretty compatible between ranges, and especially as long as you wait for one coat to dry before putting on the next, there’s not reason to limit yourself to one company.

Speaking personally, I like a lot of paints!  I think Vallejo metallic paints look amazing, though the GW gold is great.  Generally I like the GW line, but I don’t like their whites which I don’t find last very well.  I really like Army Painter paints as a good cheap option for the basics, and I find their dropper bottles easier to be consistent with if I make a colour by mixing paints.

A good rule of thumb is to stick to whatever line is most easily available that you feel happy with, and if you aren’t happy with how a particular colour goes, try an alternative from a different line.

Equipment

There’s a lot of extra equipment you can buy.  Lamps, painting handles, specialist water jugs, paint tables.  Think about the space you have available, and reach out to people on social media for thoughts on specific items.  If you ask about everything you need, you’ll be flooded with too many possibilities.  If people discuss painting lamps, the remit is more manageable.

Most of the stuff in this category beyond the actual brushes, paint and models are really very optional areas, and I’d recommend investigating them slowly if you feel a need.  Try a painting handle if you find your hand hurts while (or after) painting.  If you don’t have anywhere to leave paints set up, a little painting table you can pop on a shelf and take down for a session will make a big difference.  If you have a regular desk area to paint in, but its away from the window or main lights, look at daylight lamp options – and look at LEDs that aren’t hot to avoid drying the paints as you work!

Summary

Its such an individual hobby that it’s difficult to explain the range of options without making everything seem far too complex.  Start simple, add some complexities as you gain in confidence, exploit the fantastic range of painting videos on youtube and guides in magazines like white dwarf, stay patient and keep trying.  Its amazing fun, tremendously relaxing … and if you play games, is so satisfying using painted minis instead of bare plastic.

Sisters of Battle – Finishing an Era

Well, with two Sisters of Battle armies, and the ranges due for an update, it’s time to finish off the armies for good before starting anew.

Order of the Argent Shroud

I need to paint up:

2 Geminae to guard Celestine for the Order of the Argent Shroud.   I have some Seraphim, but they need to be converted with power swords and bolt pistols.

An Immolator – this needs to be bought, assembled and painted.

An Exorcist – this needs to be bought, assembled and painted.

3 Rhinos – these need to be bought, assembled and painted (or resprayed from previous projects)

Order of the Verdant Garden

2 Geminae to guard Celestine for the Order of the Verdant Garden.   I have some Seraphim, but they need to be converted with power swords and bolt pistols.

1 Canoness – I’d messed up one of the 2 metal canonesses, and its been stripped for repainting.

1 Seraphim – I lost one of my 10 woman squad some time ago, and need to replace her.

3 Repentia – I’ve generally been fielding them in a squad of 6, and never finished the last 3.  I need to finish these off.

1 Meltagun sister – I need this to finish off my white battle sisters squad.

1 Exorcist – I have a silver FW exorcist that I want to repaint for the green sisters, and replace it with a GW exorcist for the more classic Argent Shroud contingent.

1 Sisters Rhino – I have 2 rhinos and 2 immolators, but the last battle sisters squad could do with a transport. 

2 Immolator turret fixes – the two immolators I have were broken in an accident and sort of patched in the turrets.  With the Rhinos needed for the sisters, buying Immolators and using the turrets to fix these and then being able to use the rhinos with sisters icons rather than plain seems to make sense.  This is a bonus extra, though – the patch job isn’t terrible.

Bonus extras

With the range as a whole likely to be taken off the market, it’d be nice to add one or two of the missing models as well.  I think they’d be fantastic with Rogue Trader or Inquistorial warbands too.

Death Cult Assassins – at least 2, maybe a unit of 6

Crusaders – at least 2, maybe a unit of 6

Preacher with Chainsword

Missionary with Chainsword

Penitent Engines – at least 1, maybe a unit of 3.

As a final bonus extra, I could paint up a Canoness Veridyan in Silver and Green to add to each force.  I don’t need to, but I have the models and it’d be a nice touch.

Preparing for the Future

I need to paint up the new Celestine and Geminae for the new army, and Canoness Veridyan

Hobby Plans for 2019

Well, as we’re two weeks into 2019, I suppose I really should start doing some kind of planning!

First, I really want to track my work, as though I lost track towards the end of 2018, logging my painting made a big difference in getting things done.  I’m going to take part in #painthammer2019 – you can find loads of details over on JewelKnightJess‘s blog Silent Dream.

Second, as a rough target for the year, I’m going to aim for 100 painted minis.  I think thats achievable, and should keep me pushing and painting hard enough to get it done.

Third, I want to “finish off” my Sisters of Battle armies, which are coming up for a major relaunch.  I have two armies, one in green (the Order of the Verdant Garden) and one in silver (the Order of the Argent Shroud).  Both need some reworking for the 8th edition beta codex, and both need some key models painted for a “complete” force of around 2000pts.  Things like a couple of Gemina Superior to protect Celestine, finish off any odd or missing people from complete units, do extra Rhinos for the various squads, add an Exorcist to the Silver Sisters, and so on.  It’s not trivial amounts, but not impossible amounts either.

Fourth, I want to start a new Sisters of Battle army in the traditional Black and Red when the new army is released in plastic.  I can make a start on this with Celestine and the Geminae from the Triumvirate set, and a Canoness Veridyan.  Fingers are crossed for an all plastic exorcist and a Sisters flyer of some kind.

Fifth, I want to try and keep on top of Warhammer Conquest.  I’ve done a rubbish job so far, and its rather starting to build up, especially as I’ve built my Dark Imperium set alongside it and picked up a few extra copies of some of the issues, as well as kitbashed some primaris, and added a chaplain and a box each of intercessors, reivers and plague marines to the mix too.

Sixth, 2019 is going to be the year of the terrain for me!  With RubbleCity and a Suluco (think space hulk tiles in Resin) due from Fenris Games this year, and with terrain coming in from Warhammer Conquest and from my Shadow War and Kill Team starter sets, plus a _lot_ of old Sector Imperialis buildings that need gluing back together after a move, I should have enough terrain to run my own club!

Seventh, I want to paint up one or two Blood Bowl teams, like the new Dark Elves and my cracking Iron Golems set of Halflings.

Eighth, I want to cherry pick the odd fantasy mini to paint for fun, so I don’t get stuck grinding on tasks for the hell of it, so I’m staying subscribed to my monthly bones pack.  I won’t get them all painted, but it’ll be fun.

Ninth, and this is unlikely, but I would like to also pick one of my board games like Zombicide, Dungeon Saga, Imperial Assault, Blackstone Fortress or Star Saga, and get at least the basic starter minis (or alternatives done).  Completing all the minis I have for one game would just be amazing.

Tenth, I want to make it to at least 2 Parent Players events this year, as they are just mind-blowing fun.

Eleventh, I’m in a Blood Bowl league online!  Hopefully it’ll be really fun, and I can make time for it!  Some cracking people in the league.

There are many more possibilities and projects on hold if I blow through these like some kind of hobby demon, but it’s pretty unlikely.  Time just isn’t going to permit it, I think.

#ParentPlayers4

What is Parent Players?

Parent Players is a semi-regular meet-up with a group of wargamers who all have children and don’t often get to game. We plan the events months in advance so we can arrange childcare and make sure it’s in family diaries, and hope no emergencies, illness or accidents intervene!

As we’re all parents, we all are in the same boat, and it’s nice to play some really relaxed games and have a few beers with people who enjoy your hobby, understand the pressures you’re under, and are pretty relaxed about the fact you haven’t played a game in months and keep remembering the rules from 2 editions ago.

Most of the focus is on GW games, predominantly 40K. We meet up in Warhammer World in Nottingham on a Friday, play big games all day, retire to a nearby hotel where we get a few more beers in and play games like Fluxx in the bar. The Saturday tends to be smaller games in Bugmans as it can be hard to get tables if an event is on, and some of us may be a little worse for wear…. (Just to be clear, beers are optional and several of the regulars are teetotal. Playing silly games is the important bit!)

Tables are harder to arrange since the events team stopped taking bookings, so it’s particularly hard to guarantee availability on the Saturday.  Several of us live close enough to be able to pretty much guarantee a decent spread of tables on the Friday at opening time.  There is some talk of looking at visiting Warlord Games to try some Bolt Action or Test of Honour on Saturday if WHW is particularly crowded.

When is the next Parent Players?

The fourth Parent Players is on Friday 22 and Saturday 23rd February 2019

What do you need?

Well, to play, you’ll need the latest rules and a force for the game. We’re definitely expecting Warhammer 40K, Blackstone Fortress (with TheFirstAutarch’s gorgeous set) Bloodbowl and Shadespire to be on the agenda – if you don’t have a force for any game you’d like to play, it’s not too hard to arrange to borrow one from one of the other people attending, but you need to arrange it in advance to ensure it’s there on the day. For 40K, we tend to play fairly fluffy 2000pts lists (though we’re going to use the Chapter Approved rules and turn our warlords into Legendary Heroes). Bloodbowl tends to be standard starter teams of 1,000,000 crowns, and Shadespire is generally standard gang starter decks.

You’ll also need transport to Warhammer World, and somewhere to stay. We generally stay in the Holiday Inn near Warhammer World and several people have already booked rooms. Its certainly not compulsory to stay in the hotel if you want to arrange somewhere else, but we do have some cracking games.

It’s a pretty laid back event – some of us make up our own t-shirts to match our armies with our names and twitter handles, but again, that’s really not necessary.

How do I stay in touch?

We all can be found on twitter. I’m evilkipper and seem to be co-ordinating it at the moment, but the whole thing was the devious concept of thefirstautarch. Other regular attendees include oneoflots, avarrisxbox, grimdarkness40, bigbadbirch and alphadevilinak as well as horde of possible attendees who haven’t been able to escape the kids!

Say hi to any of us, and we’ll keep you in the loop on twitter with all the updates.

Model Releases, Rules and Limitations for GW with 8th Ed

This is a response to a common question, particularly from veterans of early editions:

“Why don’t we have XYZ option in the rules right now?”

Examples of this include Blood Angel Primaris having Chainswords as an option, while normal marines or dark angels don’t, for example.  Why aren’t the rules the same for the basic units?

Now, I’m not a lawyer at all, but in my understanding it comes down to a legal decision in the states when a more litigious GW went into conflict with Chapterhouse Studios a few years ago over some of the additional models and conversion packs they were producing.  The decisions were pretty mixed, and no one came away happy, but one point did come out:

If you have rules in a game and don’t actively sell the parts or models for those rules, it is legitimate in the US for third parties to produce their own version.

So if they released rules for all Intercessor Sergeants to have chainswords, and only had chainswords for Blood Angels in the Blood Angels Primaris upgrade packs, it might be legal (I’m staying well clear of morality here) for another company to actively produce and market chainswords for the other chapters.  It might even be OK to produce Primaris Sergeants with Chainswords.  And if that happened before GW released them, there are all sorts of issues.

Essentially, it means that GW are in a position where they literally cannot provide rules for conversions unless they also produce the models without opening the door to alternative manufacturers in the US.  That’s just the way it is.  It’s one of the main reasons that the current codexes have entries exactly matching the single weapon load outs of the manufactured models.

Its also why they release new data sheets with new models, rather than putting all the rules in a new codex months before models arrive, and why we don’t see any named characters without a specific matching model.

Its also why a token selection of Sisters of Battle have been kept up on the site in metal for years – if they don’t have them on sale at all, others could potentially actively start to sell and market Adeptus Sororitas minis.  Actually as Sisters of Battle.

At most, you can complain a little as to why a specific load out hasn’t been chosen and released yet, but differences between ranges and codexes have to match the produced models.  It’s just the legalities of the marketplace. 

One interesting note on this – by providing the legends rules for AoS and one last made to order sale of the classic model before closing down the moulds, they may be opening up the production of some of the classic characters to third parties for those wanting to play narrative games at home too.  It’s a brave move with valuable classic IP, and fantastic for the community, so kudos!

Supercharging Primaris 101 – Understand your units

Now, some people may well disagree with this, but I think the best place to start when looking at maxing out your army effectiveness is the core units.  Forget the shenanigans for now – there’s no point looking at the best ways to interact units and powers unless you understand the units and abilities to begin with!

We also want to look at their battlefield role and how you might like to use them.  There are certainly some surprises in there.

Before we get onto specifics, lets discuss some of the common points that will affect most of the army.

First, we are looking at a proper Primaris based force, not a full Astartes force. We aren’t going to look at vehicles or units that don’t have the Primaris keyword.  That’s quite a handicap – cheap troops units like scouts are really useful in the current edition, and the range of vehicles and artillery are effectively restricted to the Repulsor – a fantastic but expensive tank.  Without any real dedicated transports, troops will be exposed out of cover – minimising battleshock and maximising armour saves are going to be pretty important.  It also restricts the usefulness of many of the stratagems that tie to specific units, like the classic whirlwind/land speeder pairing.

Primaris are tough, generally with 2 wounds, but still only normally have the 3+ save, and are particularly vulnerable to heavier weapons like plasma weaponry, or mass fire if caught in the open.  With a move of 6″, they aren’t going to break any records in advancing, so options for deep striking or repositioning will add a lot of value.

As troops excel at taking and holding objectives for battle forged armies, we need to weigh up the additional advantage taking troops.  If you generally play annihilation games, where the goal is defeating your enemy rather than by objective, troops are less important and may not be as good value for the points.

With “And They Shall Know No Fear” allowing morale rerolls, battleshock isn’t a major concern like it can be for other armies .  Larger units of 10 are quite practical, especially with the option to split fire in 8th, and can significantly help in close combat.  Mind you, smaller units let you take more of the special options like sergeants and grenade launchers, and can all get into the same tanks, so its tricky!  Hopefully we’ll get more of a grip on unit size later on.

Just one note – this is my take from a  quick study of the codex.  Is it right?  No idea for sure!  There may be codex approved changes I’ve missed, or seemingly unimportant upgrades that revolutionise a unit.  Do tell me in the comments and I’ll update this!

This particular review is only covering Games Workshop units, not FW ones, though there are some key Primaris associated units found there, like a superheavy tank.  I may cover those later!

HQ

Captain (standard Mk 10 armour)

The Primaris Captain is a mid tier Primaris hero, and its easy to spend points on wargear.   They are excellent close combat fighters – at range they are great shots but don’t really have any more long range firepower than an intercessor.

They let nearby units reroll hit rolls of 1 – that’s fantastic, as it affects the most possible rolls, and ensure a second chance to over overcharged plasma weapons exploding.

They can swap their bolt rifle for stalker bolt rifle, which is well worth it if lurking in the backfield to strengthen a gun line.  They can also take an optional power sword to max out their excellent close combat skills.  Taking both probably isn’t worth it, as if you have gone for long range maximisation, you won’t get full value of a power sword over the battle.

Their iron halo, giving them a solid 4+ invulnerable save, combined with 6 wounds makes them a durable bet.

Captain (Gravis armour)

This Primaris Captain is all in for assault. With a Pistol 3 weapon, they get 3 shots a turn even when locked up, and get the choice between a clumsier gauntlet or a power sword for their hits.  All their other abilities are pretty much the same as a normal Captain, but with offence limited to short range and maximised for pure close combat, you really need to commit to an aggressive play style.   With the pistol, all the ranged weaponry is focused on killing infantry – you need to kill anything tougher up close and personal.

Captain (Power fist)

This captain is awesomely optimised for damage at short range.  A plasma pistol combined with their ability to reroll 1s is fantastic, and the power fist and their 2+ to hit in close combat is also brilliant.  While still focussed on close range, this particular option is maximised for those who love plasma, or are fighting mechanised or high toughness elite troops.

Lieutenant

The lieutenant is the cheapest Primaris hero, though only just shy of the standard Captain, and its easy to spend points on wargear.  If you are tight on points and need HQ to fill out detachments, this may be a useful choice.  They are excellent close combat fighters – at range, like the captain, they are great shots but don’t really have any more long range firepower than an intercessor.

They let nearby units reroll wound rolls of 1 – that’s not as good as rerolling 1s to hit, like the captain, as it doesn’t help with plasma explosions, and it also affects less rolls on average, as any missed rolls to hit obviously reduce the dice pool that might come up as 1s.

They can swap their bolt rifle for stalker bolt rifle, which is well worth it if lurking in the backfield to strengthen a gun line, or for a powersword to max out their excellent close combat skills.

The only solid reason I can see (beyond needing cheap HQ) to pick a lieutenant is to pair him with a captain, giving nearby units and themselves rerolls on 1s for both hit and wound.  The lack of an iron halo makes them quite vulnerable to enemy headhunters otherwise.

Librarian

The librarian is an excellent close up fighter with a force weapon, provides psychic defence by denying the witch with their psychic hood, and also allows all sorts of psychic shenanigans to be layered in with other abilities.

You need to be careful due to their lack of invulnerable saving throws, but at least one librarian seems to be a solid bet, regardless of your play style.  Unless you go all in with Black Templar philosophy, of course!

With the short range of many psychic powers, the lack of ranged weaponry, and their close combat abilities, you really need to embrace the assault phase to really get the best of librarians.  If you want to play a more measured gun line approach, you may not find they add as much value.

Chaplain

Between boosting morale, a 4+ invulnerable save, amazing close combat skills and allowing nearby units to reroll all failed hit rolls in close combat, this guy is fantastic if you want someone to lead a charge.  Clocking in at 5 points under a  basic captain, they are at least as useful on the advance in combat with the crozius arcanum giving them +1S, -1AP and 2 damage.

On the flip side, these guys are almost useless on the defense with no firepower greater than a pistol, no bonuses to nearby units (except morale, which isn’t that important to Primaris) outside of combat.  If you take a chaplain, you need an aggressive play style to get value out of them.

Troops

Intercessors

Intercessors are the only troop option available to a Primaris force.  If you are playing an objective game, or looking at building battalions aiming at the +5cp to fuel stratagems, you’ll need some of these.

They have 3 choice of weapons – standard bolt rifles, which aren’t bad rapid fire weapons with a 30″ range, Auto bolt rifles, which as 24″ assault 2 weapons are fantastic for fire and move work, or stalker bolt rifles, which are heavy 1 weapons, but give you -2 ap and a 36″ range.  Honestly, unless you want a cheap filler unit (and if that’s the case, why are you looking at elite Primaris), it feels like you want stalkers for a gun line or backfield objective holding, and auto bolt rifles for a mobile unit hurtling around the battlefield.

One interesting upgrade is the auxiliary grenade launcher – you can take 2 of these per unit, which is only useful if you combat squad it.  It effectively gives you a mini missile launcher, with a 30″ range frag or krak grenade for 1pt – 2pts to take one in both combat squads.  This seems a no brainer!

Elites

Apothecaries

Damn, the apothecary is awesome.  Between resurrecting troops or healing heroes, he also totally beats face in close combat, with some awesome close range pistols and a great stat line.  I can see the apothecary being awesome to bolster a close combat captain/lieutenant pair.  Bonuses to hit and wound combined with healing?  Primaris smash!  Is he worth the points?  I’ not sure.  I think kept near a key unit or playing aggressively to get a return in close combat would pay off, but he isn’t cheap and not throwing out anything at range.

Ancient

An ancient (or standard bearer) basically increases the leadership of nearby units, which improves their chances of not losing any models to battle shock.  With “And They Shall Know No Fear” already in effect for Primaris, its not really all that helpful, unless taking big old units.  The 50% chance of getting a last shot or attack in for fallen models is pretty good, but only when the ancient is surrounded by casualties!  

Its a great concept and very cinematic – from a narrative perspective I’d always want to take one.  Effectiveness wise, though?  Maybe if combined with hell blasters in a gun line?  Honestly, I think you can probably do better for the points just by taking small units or going for an apothecary to get models back into action long term.

Reivers

Reivers feel like a fantastic concept, but the various options they offer just don’t seem to tie together very well.  Shock grenades stopping overwatch?  That’s fantastic – except with a 6″ move and 6″ range, you have to start within 12″ of the enemy to be able to actually pull this off.  Which generally means you’ve just been shot to hell (or maybe, if lucky, had an enemy fail a charge).  Reducing enemy leadership in 3″ is fantastic for causing morale issues, but its too short a range to help for anything beyond a heaving melee, and people are quite savvy at minimising battleshock effects.  Grapnel launchers let you ignore vertical components of movement and spiderman up to the top of buildings.  That could really add value on specific levelled terrain, but at lot of the time won’t be any use.  They also let you come in 9″ away from the enemy at deployment from any table edge, but they aren’t that scary a unit to derail an advance.  Grav chutes let you deep strike from turn 2 – but again that 9″ range and the 6″ range on shock grenades doesn’t quite gel.

If you are a great player, you can probably maximise these brilliantly.  Otherwise I feel you’ll have a unit that will have a monster game if things break for them, but generally won’t perform at all.  Play on a table with grapnel launchers and lots of buildings, and have a couple of charges against you fail, and they will be AMAZING.  Play on a flat table with a canny enemy and I think you’ll struggle a bit.

Redemptor Dreadnaught

Dreadnaughts!  This is the new dreadnaught introduced with the Primaris marines, and generally accepted as part of the Primaris line.  Dreadnoughts are much tougher in 8th edition than they used to be, and the range of fire power you can load them up with is pretty huge.  Up close, at range, they are monsters.  I might be wrong, but I feel maximising their load out for anti horde firepower is probably your best bet, with the onslaught gatling cannons chucking out silly amounts of reasonable firepower that will just clear out any big tarpit units.  

However, they will draw fire like mad, and performance will degrade as they take hits.  They aren’t cheap in terms of points, and as fire magnets, you have to accept you might not get your points back from them – but other, more vulnerable units are going to get away with much lighter fire.

Aggressors

Holy hell, these guys are awesome.  While they could really do with the ability to absorb more firepower, like a 2+ save or something, they are pretty resilient with the +1T from the gravis armour,  and laden down with firepower.  With two main load outs of either multiple 8″ flamers, or frag launchers and boltstorm gauntlets, you have a really nasty array of firepower in a not too expensive package.  I’ve heard more than one primaris player suggest building your army around these and hellblasters for really nasty doses of firepower.  Are they resilient enough to get up close to use their firepower?  I think you really need to weigh up your play style with aggressors, as though they look like excellent fun, they are something of a glass hammer, and I think you need to commit to an aggressive approach to get the most out of them.  Between close range firepower, no penalty on advancing and shooting their assault weapons,  and power fist smashing in close combat, they are fast, lethal and deadly.  But leave them exposed and they’ll go down just as fast as any other Primaris.

Heavy Support

Hellblasters

Oh, yeah!  Hellblasters!  An entire unit loaded down with Plasma Weaponry.  Now, I have to admit, I tend to overcharge EVERYTHING, so this may be my achilles heel, but keep a captain nearby to reroll ones, and these bad boys might just decimate everything!

5-10 plasma guns with rapid fire? Yes!  Oh Yes!  I’m tempted to look at spearhead detachments and just load up with these.  They won’t be quite as good as troops at taking objectives, but in terms of dishing out firepower they’ll be just awesome!

Fast Attack

Inceptors

A lot of people struggle with these, but I think they could work for me.  Why?  Because most people see them as the Primaris equivalent to Assault Marines, but they really aren’t.  My read on them is that they are a fast moving weapons platform, much closer in play style to Sisters of Battle Seraphim … which I love and play well.  The key is to use them for ambush strategies, hit and run techniques, while avoiding actual close combat where you can.  If you get stuck up close, the lack of proper close combat equipment will cost you dearly, I think.  My experience with Seraphim will help, but I think these could be a lot more effective if people just didn’t play them like assault marines.  Got higher hopes than expected from studying the data sheet.

Dedicated Transport

Repulsor

Repulsors are the only vehicle currently able to transport Primaris marines, and have a variety of load outs.  Its a big scary tank.  Its going to draw fire, so you have to accept it’s going to take some hits.  One obvious thought is that will spare others, even a Redemptor dreadnaught.   It can carry a fair chunk of weaponry, or maybe carry a brutal setup of aggressors with a couple of HQ for a lethal close range boost.

I think with so many points tied up in the one model, you have to have a solid plan for using it.  Maybe its delivering a brutal CC detachment right into enemy lines, allowing your Redemptor to get a turn or two untargeted, or simply as a turn 1 tank killer, but you really need to work out how to play around it.  One oddity is that a lot of the heavy weapon options are much more short ranged, like lastalons are much shorter ranged than equivalent las-cannons.  Again, I think it lends itself to the feel of Primaris as an aggressive short range army.

Lord of War

Roboute Guilleman

Roboute is frankly amazing, optimising nearby troops to perform like absolute monsters, while having the equipment and statistics to smash some serious opposition himself.  He optimises Imperium troops, not just Astartes, so its extra value in an Imperium soup force … though we’re staying clear of those.  He’s a heck of a lot of points, but will massive optimise your army.  The bigger the game, the easier it is to fit this monster in.  I think the only fault I’d have with including him is that I’m not 100% sure he counts as Primaris being a Primarch 🙂  It seems only fair as he had them invented, and the Death Guard that I’m also looking at get Morty though!

To get the most out of Roboute, you need him to tackle hotspots while he abilities optimise the troops in you lines most in need of success.  having them get full Rerolls to hit and wound and buying you additional CPs for stratagems really should help with some nasty shenanigans.

Making Death Guard Filthy 101 – Introduction

Just like the posts I’m going to pop up for Primaris, I also intend to look at Death Guard in the same way.  I’m going to stick with the Death Guard Codex – no plague bearers or the like, so there’s a fairly big chunk of optimisation that’s going to be missed out.

Still, we’re going to go step by step through the mechanics and possibly shenanigans to get the absolutely maximum bang for your Mortarion based geneseed buck.

We’ll be looking at detachments and ways to max out command points, ways of using stratagems and psychic powers, which units seem to be the best value on the battlefield, and so on.

I think what’s important, though, is we’ll discuss the best options for different play styles and how to maximise the army for you, not just for theory hammer.  If you play an aggressive close assault game, building an army based round long range firepower will feel frustrating and ineffective, regardless of what the statistics say.  Lets look at how to have fun with it.

Supercharging Primaris 101 – Introduction

OK!  I am feeling revitalised for some hobby.  One thing a recent gaming weekend taught me, though, is that you can’t just fill slots in a detachment and stick them on the tabletop anymore.  You need to seriously think about how units work together, how abilities augment each other, how strategems can max out unit effectiveness, and how psychic powers can double down on all the above.

I’m going to document my thoughts, notes and experiences in building an army (based largely on the Warhammer Conquest minis with some augmentation).  Over time, we’re going to go through the process of looking at what units should do on the battlefield, how we can make them most effective at it, and how we can achieve the result for the best point cost.

There are some restrictions, just to make life harder for myself.  In this series, I’m going to be looking at a pure Primaris army – I won’t be looking at taking any cheeky older Astartes, or Imperial allies (though I may highlight when I think that’d be most effective).

I’m not a very competitive gamer by nature, so I’d love to hear any corrections, options of missed or additional thoughts!

Parent Players 3: Return of the Parent

If you’ve found this page, you may have come across the term #parentplayers on twitter, and want to know a little more!

What is #ParentPlayers?

Parent Players is an event every few months at Warhammer World, where parents who love war-games can book in a date with a significant other well in advance, get some time cleared in the calendar, and head off to Nottingham for some relaxed gaming with a group of fellow parents who understand why you look so tired, get why the game has to go on hold for ten mins when a significant other calls with an update on the little ones, and generally just enjoy hanging out, maybe sneaking in a few beers and burgers in the bar, and trying not to spend too much money in Forgeworld.  

What will we be playing?

The main game played is 40K, though lots of Shadespire and Bloodbowl goes on in Bugman’s Bar, and if you end up in the same hotel as a fellow attendee, expect silly light games and drinks in the hotel bar!  It’s not an official event, though obviously as it takes place at Warhammer World you will need GW manufactured forces.  If you want to try a game of something, though, there are plenty of people who can help you try – I played Shadespire at #ParentPlayers 2 thanks to @grimdarkness04 on twitter, and now am something of a convert…. though I do want a elf warband!  Most of us have spare blood bowl teams and the like, so don’t stress too much about the models if you’d like to come along.

This time, we’re also expecting to be playing a fair bit of Kill Team to maximise limited space on the Saturday, and also to be able to try out a bigger range of minis and opponents.

When and where is it held?

Currently, #ParentPlayers 3 is planned for October 19/20th at Warhammer World – All day Friday, stay over in a Hotel, then all day Saturday.  

You are more than welcome to come along for one or both days – if you can’t make Friday, do join us for 40k, Bloodbowl and Shadespire on the Saturday.

There is a nearby Holiday Inn that several of us have stayed in and really enjoyed over the first two incarnations of the event, and they were really tolerant of the silly gaming in the bar, and happily kept us in beer.  We’ve confirmed tables now, so if you are coming, you can start looking for bargains.

Don’t feel you have to stay in the hotel if you want to find a cheaper option or live locally.  We tend to play up until 9 or 10 at WHW!  But if you are there, silly games and maybe a few more drinks will go down until the wee hours.

There may be some cheaper options with AirBnB but nothing’s been finalised on that front yet.

What are the costs?

Well, there are no direct costs for Parent Players!  We’re a group of parents who love GW gaming, don’t get time to play much, so schedule in a meet up every few months.  It can get a bit expensive though!

First, we all meet up at Warhammer World in Nottingham, so you may incur travel costs to get there.  If you don’t live locally, you’ll need somewhere to stay, which probably means a hotel room – the holiday inn we tend to use is around £65 for the Friday night.

Next, food!  Bugmans is a fantastic bar and does cracking food, but it’s easy to clock up £10-15 a meal, and drinks do tend to clock up, if only soft drinks for refreshment.  If you do enjoy a few beers and silly games, that can carry on until the wee hours of the morning.

Finally, it’s Warhammer World.  If it’s your first trip, you’ll probably want to pay for the exhibition hall, and almost everyone gets a Forgeworld or unusual model from the massive GW and FW stores.  If you want something specific from Forgeworld, I’d suggest ordering online and going for store pickup to make sure you don’t miss out on the day.

It’s possible to do the event quite cheaply, especially if you just come down on one day and don’t incur accommodation and all the food costs.  But it is a cracking two days!

Bonus extra – sometimes odd themes come up in the twitter chat to inspire people to do special models or unique gifts for the attendees.  Please don’t feel obligated to do anything – if you want to paint up Tom Bombadil in a redox top for @thefirstautarch, feel free, but you don’t have to.  Lots of silly ideas do float around in the twitter chat group. 

Who will be there?

Well, there are several regular attendees you can approach on Twitter if you are interested in attending – 

@thefirstautarch

@evilkipper

@xacheriel

@grimdarkness40 – he won’t be coming along to 3, unfortunately!

@bigbadbirch

The whole event was actually the brainchild of the absolute top man, @wilsongrahams – thanks to the vagaries of life as a parent, ironically he hasn’t been able to go as yet, though we’ve got fingers crossed he’ll make it this time.

Reserved tables

On Friday 19th, we have the J’Migan Bridge 6×12 table for multiple small games, or combined megagames of 40k, the Ruins of Aphelion III for 40k (which is the scenery from the photography studio, so some cracking pics!), and… yes, we have the Death of Imperus Terrum warlord table too.  As a bonus, we have a 3×3 Sector Mechanicus Necromunda table to sneak in a little kill team.

On Saturday 20th, we have the Tau Research Station 6×12 table for multiple small games or combined megagames of 40k, the Death of Imperius Terrum again, and the 3×3 Zone Mortals  Necromunda table for some kill team too.

T-Shirts

I get my own event t-shirts made up at streetshirts.co.uk – I try to colour code a t-shirt and logo around my chosen army or blood bowl team, put my preferred name, twitter handle and #parentplayers on the front, with a big #parentplayers and an appropriate slogan on the back.  Feel free to make your own – its by no means compulsory, but makes it a lot easier to spot you if its your first time!

Other Notes

This page will be fairly regularly updated with an idea of the attendees, tables and other details as the time gets nearer, but say hi to any of us on twitter – we have a discussion group that is pretty crazy where we chat about the forces we might bring, alternative games to play and just staying in touch!

We’re parents – lets get playing, even if its only a few times a year!